Corn planting progress back on track

Published on: May 28, 2013

Despite widespread precipitation that slowed their pace considerably from the previous week, farmers have gotten corn planting largely back on schedule after a record late start. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, corn planting is now 86% complete, compared with the 90% 5-year average.

Farmers planted 58% of the nation’s expected corn acreage in just 2 weeks, including the 15% planted in the week ending May 26. During the week prior, farmers planted a record-matching 43% of expected acreage. 

“Farmers again demonstrated that, by working tirelessly and using new technology that allows us to cover more ground in less time, we can accomplish an incredible amount given the smallest planting window,” said National Corn Growers Association President Pam Johnson, a farmer from Iowa. “Now, we have planted more than half of the corn acres in the country in only two weeks. America's farmers are working hard to grow the food, feed, fuel and fiber that our country, and our world, need.”

As expected following the record-tying Mid-May planting effort, the pace of corn emergence gained swiftly last week. Fifty-four percent of the crop is now emerged, still behind the 67% 5-year average, but a vast improvement over the mere 19% emerged as of May 19. 

North Carolina farmers have completed corn-planting operations, statistically speaking, and producers in Illinois, Indiana and Iowa have planted more than 85% of their prospective crop, according to the weekly data from the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Wisconsin remains at the back of the 18-state corn-producing pack, with 64% of the state’s crop seeded as of Sunday evening.

Soybean planting, meanwhile accelerated during the week, reaching 44% completion through Sunday. Progress lags the 5-year average of 61%, but is well ahead of the 24% completed as of May 19. Emergence gained 11 percentage points, tallying 14% emerged as of May 27.