H7N9 cases require strong biosecurity response

Published on: Apr 5, 2013

Responding to the occurrence of the A(H7N9) influenza virus in China requires strong biosecurity measures, according to the U.N. Food & Agriculture Organization (FAO). Unlike other influenza strains, including highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1, this new virus is hard to detect in poultry because the novel virus causes little to no signs of disease in animals, FAO said.

"Unlike H5N1, where chickens were dying off on a large scale, with this virus, we don't have a red flag that immediately signals an infection. This means farmers may not be aware that virus is circulating in their flock. Biosecurity and hygiene measures will help people protect themselves from virus circulating in seemingly healthy birds or other animals," FAO chief veterinary officer Juan Lubroth said April 5.

FAO commended China's quick notification of human cases and subsequent release of detailed information to the public on the nature of the virus and other precautionary measures. With this information, FAO and the international scientific community have been analyzing the virus sequence in hopes of better understanding its behavior and its potential impact humans and animals.

"With the virus harder to detect, good biosecurity measures become even more essential to reducing the risk of virus transmission to humans and animals. Good biosecurity and hygiene measures implemented by farmers, livestock producers, transporters, market workers and consumers represent the first and most effective way to protect the food chain," Lubroth said.

FAO said it is monitoring the situation closely through its wide network of country and regional offices and key partners, including the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE).

The FAO and OIE reference center, the Harbin Veterinary Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, is leading laboratory analysis in response to the situation. The scientific community and FAO are currently working to optimize diagnostic approaches in order to better detect this new strain of influenza virus.